In the Field

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Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 
Meghan’s project with Meg Jones, reporting for the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Aghanistan: Packing Up the War.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 

Meghan’s project with Meg Jones, reporting for the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Aghanistan: Packing Up the War.

Thembisa Nkuzo, a resident of Nkaneng settlement in Marikana, stirs a fresh batch of home-brewed beer at her aunt’s illicit shebeen.
Like many residents of Marikana, the 28 year old migrated here from the Eastern Cape—one of the poorest regions of the country and a long-term supplier of low-wage labor for the mining industry—many years ago in search of a job. She now finds occasional work as a seamstress, and helps the running of her relatives’ shebeen, where a large tin of beer sells for twelve rand and a smaller for eleven.
The beer is made from fermented maize meal and corn, to which boiling water is added before it’s left to sit for three days. The police regularly raid the shebeen and destroy its stock, forcing Thembisa’s aunt, Mazula, to either pay out bribes or begin again from scratch. “Since the strike began, we’ve had many more people stopping by to drink,” Mazula told us. “They drink because they’re bored, but most of all they drink because they’re hungry. It’s a cheap way to fill their bellies.”


Image by Jason Larkin, text by Jack Shenker. South Africa, 2014.
Two years since the massacre of mineworkers in Marikana, Larkin and Shenker’s report on the continued struggle for justice.

Thembisa Nkuzo, a resident of Nkaneng settlement in Marikana, stirs a fresh batch of home-brewed beer at her aunt’s illicit shebeen.

Like many residents of Marikana, the 28 year old migrated here from the Eastern Cape—one of the poorest regions of the country and a long-term supplier of low-wage labor for the mining industry—many years ago in search of a job. She now finds occasional work as a seamstress, and helps the running of her relatives’ shebeen, where a large tin of beer sells for twelve rand and a smaller for eleven.

The beer is made from fermented maize meal and corn, to which boiling water is added before it’s left to sit for three days. The police regularly raid the shebeen and destroy its stock, forcing Thembisa’s aunt, Mazula, to either pay out bribes or begin again from scratch. “Since the strike began, we’ve had many more people stopping by to drink,” Mazula told us. “They drink because they’re bored, but most of all they drink because they’re hungry. It’s a cheap way to fill their bellies.”

Image by Jason Larkin, text by Jack Shenker. South Africa, 2014.

Two years since the massacre of mineworkers in Marikana, Larkin and Shenker’s report on the continued struggle for justice.
Deciding on a company t-shirt at cigar night is very serious business.


Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014.

Deciding on a company t-shirt at cigar night is very serious business.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014.

Mark and Dillon and mountains. “Now you’re SAFE!” they laughed as I put on my safety harness to photograph them working on the roof. My harness wasn’t attached to anything.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 
A day in the life for troops from the Wisconsin National Guard in Afghanistan

Mark and Dillon and mountains. “Now you’re SAFE!” they laughed as I put on my safety harness to photograph them working on the roof. My harness wasn’t attached to anything.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 

A day in the life for troops from the Wisconsin National Guard in Afghanistan
The ANC local branch office in the shack settlement of Nkaneng, which borders the Lonmin mine in Marikana.
The office was attacked and set ablaze by local residents in the days leading up to this year’s general election, the latest episode in a litany of anti-ANC activism across the region that also saw government ministers being chased out of nearby towns and President Zuma cancelling a campaign stop in the area due to fears of violence. Local residents remain furious at the ANC government’s apparent unwillingness to hold police and corporate executives accountable for the 2012 Marikana massacre, and are angry at the ANC’s perceived collaboration with big business at the expense of ordinary communities whose living standards have shown little sign of improvement after 20-years of ANC-led democracy.
The ANC ended up securing 62% of the vote nationally, but saw their support crumble in the platinum mining belt.

Image by Jason Larkin, caption by Jack Shenker. South Africa, 2014.
Read Larkin and Shenker’s reporting on Marikana’s struggle for justice, two years after the massacre of mineworkers there.

The ANC local branch office in the shack settlement of Nkaneng, which borders the Lonmin mine in Marikana.

The office was attacked and set ablaze by local residents in the days leading up to this year’s general election, the latest episode in a litany of anti-ANC activism across the region that also saw government ministers being chased out of nearby towns and President Zuma cancelling a campaign stop in the area due to fears of violence. Local residents remain furious at the ANC government’s apparent unwillingness to hold police and corporate executives accountable for the 2012 Marikana massacre, and are angry at the ANC’s perceived collaboration with big business at the expense of ordinary communities whose living standards have shown little sign of improvement after 20-years of ANC-led democracy.

The ANC ended up securing 62% of the vote nationally, but saw their support crumble in the platinum mining belt.

Image by Jason Larkin, caption by Jack Shenker. South Africa, 2014.

Read Larkin and Shenker’s reporting on Marikana’s struggle for justice, two years after the massacre of mineworkers there.

Laura reads a letter from home after receiving a package with a juicer in it —a mighty good gift for someone in this environment.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 
Pulitzer staff Meghan Dhaliwal joins grantee Meg Jones reporting from Afghanistan.

Laura reads a letter from home after receiving a package with a juicer in it —a mighty good gift for someone in this environment.

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 

Pulitzer staff Meghan Dhaliwal joins grantee Meg Jones reporting from Afghanistan.

This building at Bastøy acts as an accessible school and church; where all inmates have the right to further their education in the field of their interest. This is a major part of the prison’s focus in rehabilitation and reintegration back into the community after completing a sentence.

Image and text by Britton Nagy, via Instagram. Norway, 2014. 
Nagy is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from High Point University, reporting on the high benefits of low security within Norway’s rehabilitation-focused prison system. 

This building at Bastøy acts as an accessible school and church; where all inmates have the right to further their education in the field of their interest. This is a major part of the prison’s focus in rehabilitation and reintegration back into the community after completing a sentence.

Image and text by Britton Nagy, via Instagram. Norway, 2014. 

Nagy is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from High Point University, reporting on the high benefits of low security within Norway’s rehabilitation-focused prison system. 

A small temple in Bangkok’s commercial center, where demonstrators have clashed violently with police, has been quiet since the recent military coup. The Thai economy has been one of the strongest in Southeast Asia, with opulent new malls constantly under construction.

Image and text by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2014. 
Read Pulitzer Center grantee Richard Bernstein’s report on a revolution by motorcycle, part of a series on democracy in Thailand. 

A small temple in Bangkok’s commercial center, where demonstrators have clashed violently with police, has been quiet since the recent military coup. The Thai economy has been one of the strongest in Southeast Asia, with opulent new malls constantly under construction.

Image and text by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2014. 

Read Pulitzer Center grantee Richard Bernstein’s report on a revolution by motorcycle, part of a series on democracy in Thailand. 

Part of me was silently thrilled to see that I was not the only one wiped after today. Erica was smart and laid down—I did the I’m-trying-not-to-fall-asleep head bob with my Kevlar helmet on and now cannot turn my head to the right. 

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 

Pulitzer staff Meghan Dhaliwal joins grantee Meg Jones in Afghanistan to report on the Wisconsin National Guard Unit packing up the war. 

Part of me was silently thrilled to see that I was not the only one wiped after today. Erica was smart and laid down—I did the I’m-trying-not-to-fall-asleep head bob with my Kevlar helmet on and now cannot turn my head to the right. 

Image and caption by Meghan Dhaliwal, via Instagram. Afghanistan, 2014. 

Pulitzer staff Meghan Dhaliwal joins grantee Meg Jones in Afghanistan to report on the Wisconsin National Guard Unit packing up the war

Pictures of Thailand’s revered king, Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world’s longest-reigning monarch, are everywhere, this one on a road leading out of Chiangmai in the north.

Image and text by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2014. 

Read Pulitzer Center grantee Richard Bernstein’s report on a revolution by motorcycle, part of a series on democracy in Thailand. 

Pictures of Thailand’s revered king, Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world’s longest-reigning monarch, are everywhere, this one on a road leading out of Chiangmai in the north.

Image and text by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2014. 

Read Pulitzer Center grantee Richard Bernstein’s report on a revolution by motorcycle, part of a series on democracy in Thailand. 

"Spiritually, it is against god’s will. God created a man and a woman for reproduction. That is how we sustain humanity. If homosexuality continues, the human race will be wiped out."
— Ibrahim Kagolola, Head of Laity, St. Paul’s Church Kiwuliriza, Evangelical
From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014.

Read about Uganda’s movement to strengthen human rights in Zalcman’s project, The People Fighting for LGBT Freedom in Uganda. 

"Spiritually, it is against god’s will. God created a man and a woman for reproduction. That is how we sustain humanity. If homosexuality continues, the human race will be wiped out."

— Ibrahim Kagolola, Head of Laity, St. Paul’s Church Kiwuliriza, Evangelical

From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014.

Read about Uganda’s movement to strengthen human rights in Zalcman’s project, The People Fighting for LGBT Freedom in Uganda

"Today you say you hate gay people, tomorrow God will give you a gay son. And what will you do then? Hate him? You have to work with people who have different beliefs."
— Hassan Kimbugwe, Chairman, Kabalagala Islamic Center Kassam Mosque
From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 
View Zalcman’s images representing the Double Lives of Kuchus in Uganda, here.

"Today you say you hate gay people, tomorrow God will give you a gay son. And what will you do then? Hate him? You have to work with people who have different beliefs."

— Hassan Kimbugwe, Chairman, Kabalagala Islamic Center Kassam Mosque

From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

View Zalcman’s images representing the Double Lives of Kuchus in Uganda, here.

"Homosexuality is something that can be corrected. No one is born gay, circumstances force people into it. I don’t believe that God would create something so disoriented."
— Revered Father Christopher William Kiwanuka, St. Peter’s Parish Church, Catholic
From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read about Uganda’s strengthening human rights movement in Zalcman’s project, The People Fighting for LGBT Freedom in Uganda. 

"Homosexuality is something that can be corrected. No one is born gay, circumstances force people into it. I don’t believe that God would create something so disoriented."

— Revered Father Christopher William Kiwanuka, St. Peter’s Parish Church, Catholic

From a series on the faces of faith in Kampala.

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read about Uganda’s strengthening human rights movement in Zalcman’s project, The People Fighting for LGBT Freedom in Uganda

Bad Black, Faces of Uganda Pride

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read Zalcman’s interview with gay rights activist, Pepe Julian Onziema, here. 

Bad Black, Faces of Uganda Pride

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read Zalcman’s interview with gay rights activist, Pepe Julian Onziema, here

Chrisella, Faces of Uganda Pride

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read Zalcman’s interview with gay rights activist, Pepe Julian Onziema, here. 

Chrisella, Faces of Uganda Pride

Image and text by Daniella Zalcman, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Read Zalcman’s interview with gay rights activist, Pepe Julian Onziema, here