In the Field

RSS
The water in the Sanishare camp is turned on for two hours each day. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

The water in the Sanishare camp is turned on for two hours each day. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Bats for sale in Bangui’s central market, three for $4. Technically they are illegal but so are hand grenades and apparently there is a glut of them trading illicitly in the city. (An EU peacekeeper told me that locals told him a Chinese grenade could be had for less than a dollar.)
The bats present a whole other—and in some ways scarier—threat. With West African nations desperately trying to halt the worst-ever recorded Ebola epidemic, health officials warn that consuming bush meat, especially bats, which are known vectors for the virus, could be the match that sparks the next wave of infections. (In addition to bats, monkeys are another potential source of Ebola and are featured on the menus of several local restaurants. “It’s our traditional food,” the bat vendor told me. “You should try it.”)
It must be noted that CAR has never had a recorded outbreak of Ebola. But if one were to happen now, with the country’s health service essentially shuttered and a quarter of the population displaced by fighting, it could turn the current tragic situation into a nightmare beyond compare. 


Image and text by Peter Gwin, via Instagram. Central African Republic, 2014.
Archive: The scribes of Timbuktu in Gwin’s 2013 Pulitzer Center-supported report for the National Geographic. 

Bats for sale in Bangui’s central market, three for $4. Technically they are illegal but so are hand grenades and apparently there is a glut of them trading illicitly in the city. (An EU peacekeeper told me that locals told him a Chinese grenade could be had for less than a dollar.)

The bats present a whole other—and in some ways scarier—threat. With West African nations desperately trying to halt the worst-ever recorded Ebola epidemic, health officials warn that consuming bush meat, especially bats, which are known vectors for the virus, could be the match that sparks the next wave of infections. (In addition to bats, monkeys are another potential source of Ebola and are featured on the menus of several local restaurants. “It’s our traditional food,” the bat vendor told me. “You should try it.”)

It must be noted that CAR has never had a recorded outbreak of Ebola. But if one were to happen now, with the country’s health service essentially shuttered and a quarter of the population displaced by fighting, it could turn the current tragic situation into a nightmare beyond compare. 

Image and text by Peter Gwin, via Instagram. Central African Republic, 2014.

Archive: The scribes of Timbuktu in Gwin’s 2013 Pulitzer Center-supported report for the National Geographic. 

Salina Khanal, 4, points to pictures on the newspaper that is the wallpaper in her neighbor’s hut. Salina and her family are Lhotshampa refugees living in camps in Nepal, but are preparing to resettle in the United States.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Salina Khanal, 4, points to pictures on the newspaper that is the wallpaper in her neighbor’s hut. Salina and her family are Lhotshampa refugees living in camps in Nepal, but are preparing to resettle in the United States.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Pulitzer Center grantee and New America fellow Katherine Zoepf traveled to Saudi Arabia to document the lives of the newly employed women in the kingdom. 
Her project discusses the challenges and freedom that accompany employment.
–––––
TOMORROW: Katherine Zoepf will speak on September 17th as part of a Talks @ Pulitzer Women and Children series, at the Pulitzer Center in Washington, D.C. More information here. 

Pulitzer Center grantee and New America fellow Katherine Zoepf traveled to Saudi Arabia to document the lives of the newly employed women in the kingdom. 

Her project discusses the challenges and freedom that accompany employment.

–––––

TOMORROW: Katherine Zoepf will speak on September 17th as part of a Talks @ Pulitzer Women and Children series, at the Pulitzer Center in Washington, D.C. More information here

Salina Khanal, 4, points to pictures on the newspaper that is the wallpaper in her neighbor’s hut. Salina and her family are Lhotshampa refugees living in camps in Nepal, but are preparing to resettle in the United States.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Salina Khanal, 4, points to pictures on the newspaper that is the wallpaper in her neighbor’s hut. Salina and her family are Lhotshampa refugees living in camps in Nepal, but are preparing to resettle in the United States.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

ARCHIVE: Enduring Rifts in Santiago, Chile
Election Day. 

Image and caption by Jon Lowenstein, via Instagram. Chile, 2013.
 Pulitzer Center grantees Jon and his brother Jeff reported from Chile on last year’s presidential election.

ARCHIVE: Enduring Rifts in Santiago, Chile

Election Day. 

Image and caption by Jon Lowenstein, via Instagram. Chile, 2013.

Pulitzer Center grantees Jon and his brother Jeff reported from Chile on last year’s presidential election.

Above, a Saturday farmers market attracts huge crowds in Beijing, as street vendors call out prices and buyers vie for the best produce: live fish and crabs and freshly butchered cuts of meat.
Fresh produce is sold for few hours every day in Beijing’s street markets, offering a dizzying array of variety and freshness. But as China’s urban population grows, supplying local tastes could prove challenging. When rural residents migrate to the city, some reports show a greater dietary consumption of meat.
The USDA forecasts a rise in China’s meat consumption over the next decade, with pork, already the most popular, expected to rise the fastest. There’s speculation, however, that less expensive chicken will take a greater market share.
And the appetite for chicken feet, pig ears and innards is more than a cultural tradition: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and could provide an export opportunity for producers in the U.S., says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.


Image and text by Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.
In a report by Pulitzer Center grantees Lynn Hicks and Rodney White, read how Shanghai looks to duck the “middle-income trap.”

Above, a Saturday farmers market attracts huge crowds in Beijing, as street vendors call out prices and buyers vie for the best produce: live fish and crabs and freshly butchered cuts of meat.

Fresh produce is sold for few hours every day in Beijing’s street markets, offering a dizzying array of variety and freshness. But as China’s urban population grows, supplying local tastes could prove challenging. When rural residents migrate to the city, some reports show a greater dietary consumption of meat.

The USDA forecasts a rise in China’s meat consumption over the next decade, with pork, already the most popular, expected to rise the fastest. There’s speculation, however, that less expensive chicken will take a greater market share.

And the appetite for chicken feet, pig ears and innards is more than a cultural tradition: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and could provide an export opportunity for producers in the U.S., says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.

Image and text by Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.

In a report by Pulitzer Center grantees Lynn Hicks and Rodney White, read how Shanghai looks to duck the “middle-income trap.”

In Beijing, covered-market vendors sell freshly butchered cuts of meat.
The USDA has forecast a rise in China’s meat consumption in the coming decade, with pork—already the most popular—expected to rise the fastest. Some speculate, however, that less expensive chicken will take a larger share. And appetites for pig ears, innards and a chicken’s feet are more than cultural tradition: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and, says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes, could provide export opportunities for producers in the U.S.


Image by Rodney White, text by Lynn Hicks, via Instagram. China, 2014.
Grantees Lynn Hicks and Rodney White predict food security challenges faced by China.

In Beijing, covered-market vendors sell freshly butchered cuts of meat.

The USDA has forecast a rise in China’s meat consumption in the coming decade, with pork—already the most popular—expected to rise the fastest. Some speculate, however, that less expensive chicken will take a larger share. And appetites for pig ears, innards and a chicken’s feet are more than cultural tradition: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and, says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes, could provide export opportunities for producers in the U.S.

Image by Rodney White, text by Lynn Hicks, via Instagram. China, 2014.

Grantees Lynn Hicks and Rodney White predict food security challenges faced by China.

A sea wall built using coral and concrete.

Images and text by Janice Cantieri. Kiribati, 2014.
Janice Cantieri is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Washington University reporting on the nationals of Kiribati facing displacement due to global warming.

A sea wall built using coral and concrete.

Images and text by Janice Cantieri. Kiribati, 2014.

Janice Cantieri is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Washington University reporting on the nationals of Kiribati facing displacement due to global warming.

A government-built sea wall has been destroyed by the sea in Temwaiku Village. 


Images and text by Janice Cantieri. Kiribati, 2014.
Janice Cantieri is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Washington University reporting on the nationals of Kiribati facing displacement due to global warming.

A government-built sea wall has been destroyed by the sea in Temwaiku Village. 

Images and text by Janice Cantieri. Kiribati, 2014.

Janice Cantieri is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Washington University reporting on the nationals of Kiribati facing displacement due to global warming.

Martin Palmer, co-founder and secretary general of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation, speaks on ecological civilization in China with Jon Sawyer of the Pulitzer Center.
His two favorite religious sites in China are centers for the practice of Taoism: “Bai Yun Guan 白雲觀”, the white cloud temple, in Beijing; and Lou Guan Tai near Xi’an, where Tao Te Ching was written by Laozi.

Image and text by Pulitzer Center special projects coordinator Jin Ding, via Instagram. Washington, D.C., 2014.
Visit Pulitzer Center China online to read in Mandarin reporting by our journalists. Managing editor, Jin Ding.

Martin Palmer, co-founder and secretary general of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation, speaks on ecological civilization in China with Jon Sawyer of the Pulitzer Center.

His two favorite religious sites in China are centers for the practice of Taoism: “Bai Yun Guan 白雲觀”, the white cloud temple, in Beijing; and Lou Guan Tai near Xi’an, where Tao Te Ching was written by Laozi.

Image and text by Pulitzer Center special projects coordinator Jin Ding, via Instagram. Washington, D.C., 2014.

Visit Pulitzer Center China online to read in Mandarin reporting by our journalists. Managing editor, Jin Ding.

A little girl helps sell her family’s carrots during Beijing daily open air street market. A Saturday farmers market attracts huge crowds in Beijing, as street vendors bark out prices and buyers vie for the best produce, live fish and crabs, and freshly butchered cuts of meat. Such markets offer a dizzying array of variety and freshness. Supplying local tastes, however, could prove challenging as China’s urban population grows.
As rural residents move to the cities, they eat much more meat, studies have shown. The USDA forecasts that Chinese meat consumption will rise over the next decade. Pork, China’s primary meat, is expected to rise the fastest, but cheaper chicken could also take a larger share of the Chinese diet.
And Chinese appetites for chicken feet, pig ears and innards are more than a cultural curiosity: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and it could be a growing opportunity for U.S. producers to export these cuts, says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.
The big questions: Can notoriously inefficient Chinese livestock producers compete with cheap imports? And if China pursues self-sufficiency in pork, will consumers pay the price of more expensive meat?

by Lynn Hicks and Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.
Reporting on China’s food security challenges by Pulitzer Center grantees Rodney White and Lynn Hicks. 

A little girl helps sell her family’s carrots during Beijing daily open air street market. A Saturday farmers market attracts huge crowds in Beijing, as street vendors bark out prices and buyers vie for the best produce, live fish and crabs, and freshly butchered cuts of meat. Such markets offer a dizzying array of variety and freshness. Supplying local tastes, however, could prove challenging as China’s urban population grows.

As rural residents move to the cities, they eat much more meat, studies have shown. The USDA forecasts that Chinese meat consumption will rise over the next decade. Pork, China’s primary meat, is expected to rise the fastest, but cheaper chicken could also take a larger share of the Chinese diet.

And Chinese appetites for chicken feet, pig ears and innards are more than a cultural curiosity: Using the whole animal has provided food security for China, and it could be a growing opportunity for U.S. producers to export these cuts, says Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.

The big questions: Can notoriously inefficient Chinese livestock producers compete with cheap imports? And if China pursues self-sufficiency in pork, will consumers pay the price of more expensive meat?

by Lynn Hicks and Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.

Reporting on China’s food security challenges by Pulitzer Center grantees Rodney White and Lynn Hicks

From left to right: Eduardo Santaya Chamorro (age 47), Eduardo Chamarro Moncada (78), Carmen Leticia Moncada Palacios (age 90), and Maria Chamarro Moncada (age 69).
The family of five, including Eduardo Santaya’s wife (not pictured), represent a post-nuclear family structure in Lima, Peru, where a greater number of older adults are now caring for the oldest-old.


Image and text by Michelle Ferng. Peru, 2014.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-Pulitzer Center student fellow Michelle Ferng, reports from Peru on the aging crisis underway. 
Peru: An Aging Revolution

From left to right: Eduardo Santaya Chamorro (age 47), Eduardo Chamarro Moncada (78), Carmen Leticia Moncada Palacios (age 90), and Maria Chamarro Moncada (age 69).

The family of five, including Eduardo Santaya’s wife (not pictured), represent a post-nuclear family structure in Lima, Peru, where a greater number of older adults are now caring for the oldest-old.

Image and text by Michelle Ferng. Peru, 2014.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-Pulitzer Center student fellow Michelle Ferng, reports from Peru on the aging crisis underway.

Peru: An Aging Revolution

To understand the complexity of the problems in the Central African Republic, consider the global crosscurrents represented by Aristide’s shirt.
He lives in Boyrabe, a predominantly Christian neighborhood that was heavily targeted by the predominantly Muslim fighters when the Seleka swept into Bangui last year. And lately, the neighborhood’s pro-Anti Balaka residents have skirmished the French peacekeeping force. And yet, Aristide wears a jersey from the French football club Paris Saint-Germain, which is owned by Qatar (a nation where, according to the UN, Seleka leaders have gone for funding) and sponsored by Emirates (an airline owned by Dubai, which is one of the places where, according to the Enough Project, smuggled CAR diamonds end up).
Aristide isn’t alone. I’ve seen dozens of PSG shirts as well as those for the English club Arsenal (also sponsored by Emirates). The shirt itself, an unlicensed knockoff, was likely made in China—along with most of the plastic goods in the marketplace and the majority of the motorcycles and scooters that dominate the roads—a nation that has been eager to gain access to CAR’s resources in recent years.
When I asked Aristide why he likes Paris Saint-Germain, he lists two of the team’s players who come from CAR’s neighbors Hervin Ongenda (DRC) and Jean Christophe Bahebeck (Cameroon). But mainly, he says, “I like football.”


Image and text by Peter Gwin, via Instagram. Central African Republic, 2014.

Archive: The scribes of Timbuktu in Gwin’s 2013 Pulitzer Center-supported report for the National Geographic. 

To understand the complexity of the problems in the Central African Republic, consider the global crosscurrents represented by Aristide’s shirt.

He lives in Boyrabe, a predominantly Christian neighborhood that was heavily targeted by the predominantly Muslim fighters when the Seleka swept into Bangui last year. And lately, the neighborhood’s pro-Anti Balaka residents have skirmished the French peacekeeping force. And yet, Aristide wears a jersey from the French football club Paris Saint-Germain, which is owned by Qatar (a nation where, according to the UN, Seleka leaders have gone for funding) and sponsored by Emirates (an airline owned by Dubai, which is one of the places where, according to the Enough Project, smuggled CAR diamonds end up).

Aristide isn’t alone. I’ve seen dozens of PSG shirts as well as those for the English club Arsenal (also sponsored by Emirates). The shirt itself, an unlicensed knockoff, was likely made in China—along with most of the plastic goods in the marketplace and the majority of the motorcycles and scooters that dominate the roads—a nation that has been eager to gain access to CAR’s resources in recent years.

When I asked Aristide why he likes Paris Saint-Germain, he lists two of the team’s players who come from CAR’s neighbors Hervin Ongenda (DRC) and Jean Christophe Bahebeck (Cameroon). But mainly, he says, “I like football.”

Image and text by Peter Gwin, via Instagram. Central African Republic, 2014.

Archive: The scribes of Timbuktu in Gwin’s 2013 Pulitzer Center-supported report for the National Geographic. 

Nurse Jane speaks with a high school student who was part of the school-centered HPV vaccine trials in the Nakasongola District of Central Uganda.

Image and text by Sascha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014.
Sascha Garry is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Boston University. Read more of her reporting on cervical cancer in Uganda.

Nurse Jane speaks with a high school student who was part of the school-centered HPV vaccine trials in the Nakasongola District of Central Uganda.

Image and text by Sascha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014.

Sascha Garry is a Pulitzer Center student fellow from Boston University. Read more of her reporting on cervical cancer in Uganda.