In the Field

RSS
Latergram from last week’s Kalb Report with Justices Scalia and Bader Ginsberg at the National Press Club, Thursday, April 18. They spoke with Marvin Kalb about the first amendment and freedoms of the press, origins and contemporary interpretations.


Image by Rebecca Gibian, via Instagram. Washington, DC, 2014.
To watch, visit C-SPAN’s website.

Latergram from last week’s Kalb Report with Justices Scalia and Bader Ginsberg at the National Press Club, Thursday, April 18. They spoke with Marvin Kalb about the first amendment and freedoms of the press, origins and contemporary interpretations.

Image by Rebecca Gibian, via Instagram. Washington, DC, 2014.

To watch, visit C-SPAN’s website.

Reporting from a Buddhist eating ceremony outside Seoul. No food is left behind.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.
Reporting from South Korea where over 90% of food waste is recycled. Food waste totals near 1.3 billion tons annually, according to UN reports.

Reporting from a Buddhist eating ceremony outside Seoul. No food is left behind.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.

Reporting from South Korea where over 90% of food waste is recycled. Food waste totals near 1.3 billion tons annually, according to UN reports.

West Bengal
Two tragedies at BC Roy Memorial Hospital in Kolkata played out in India’s national media, making it an unfortunate symbol of the nation’s struggles with infant mortality. During June of 2011, 18 newborns died in only two days. In September of 2013, 41 newborns died in only six days. Tabloid headlines screamed out things like “neglect” and “bad medicine” but what we found in our investigation was that BC Roy had less to do with the deaths of those babies than the ailing medical infrastructure of rural West Bengal. 
The media never asked one crucial question: Why were so many babies dying at this one particular hospital?
The babies who typically arrive at BC Roy requiring urgent care do so from faraway. When local hospitals or primary care centers are unequipped to sustain a life (or worse yet when hospital lines are too long) doctors from those hospitals dispatch them to Kolkata in a last ditch effort to save them. Some parents travel eight hours by car — with time rapidly running out. Therefore, it’s hardly surprising that the death toll reaches such ugly numbers at a hospital seen by many as being the final chance for survival.
India’s rural hospitals don’t attract the level of media attention they deserve but their conditions are unsanitary, their equipment is insufficient, and they are woefully understaffed. The circumstances there are bad enough to end many, many lives and those deaths that are reported from BC Roy only represent a tiny fraction of the problem.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.
On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.
The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

West Bengal

Two tragedies at BC Roy Memorial Hospital in Kolkata played out in India’s national media, making it an unfortunate symbol of the nation’s struggles with infant mortality. During June of 2011, 18 newborns died in only two days. In September of 2013, 41 newborns died in only six days. Tabloid headlines screamed out things like “neglect” and “bad medicine” but what we found in our investigation was that BC Roy had less to do with the deaths of those babies than the ailing medical infrastructure of rural West Bengal. 

The media never asked one crucial question: Why were so many babies dying at this one particular hospital?

The babies who typically arrive at BC Roy requiring urgent care do so from faraway. When local hospitals or primary care centers are unequipped to sustain a life (or worse yet when hospital lines are too long) doctors from those hospitals dispatch them to Kolkata in a last ditch effort to save them. Some parents travel eight hours by car — with time rapidly running out. Therefore, it’s hardly surprising that the death toll reaches such ugly numbers at a hospital seen by many as being the final chance for survival.

India’s rural hospitals don’t attract the level of media attention they deserve but their conditions are unsanitary, their equipment is insufficient, and they are woefully understaffed. The circumstances there are bad enough to end many, many lives and those deaths that are reported from BC Roy only represent a tiny fraction of the problem.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.

On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.

The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

Laboratory at a primary health center in Bihar, India. Part of a series on India’s Hospital Crisis for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Image and caption by Sami Siva. India, 2014.
“In West Bengal, A Pilgrimage of the Sick,” by Michael Edison Hayden and Sami Siva for Roads and Kingdoms, April 2104.

On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.
The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

Laboratory at a primary health center in Bihar, India. Part of a series on India’s Hospital Crisis for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Image and caption by Sami Siva. India, 2014.

In West Bengal, A Pilgrimage of the Sick,” by Michael Edison Hayden and Sami Siva for Roads and Kingdoms, April 2104.

Gujurat
Narendra Modi, Gujarat’s Chief Minister, is rapidly becoming India’s most high profile politician. A leading candidate for Prime Minister in the country’s upcoming elections, the mere mention of his name can start a long, angry debate here. But one thing seldom discussed are his “yojanas,” or health care schemes for the poor.
And that’s unfortunate because they are currently the leading answer that Indian politicians have to the question of what should be done about sick residents living below the poverty line.
On the surface, few would argue against the promotion of these yojanas. One of them insures patients who live below the poverty line and their families up to $3800 (US Dollars) for serious medical procedures like surgeries.
But critics of the plans argue that they are a political posture, and do nothing to alter the lives of the patients who use them.
We spoke to private doctors who refuse to accept the plans, because of the lack of adequate reimbursement. This relegates patients to a government hospital system that is flawed, unsanitary and downright dangerous.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.
On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.
The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

Gujurat

Narendra Modi, Gujarat’s Chief Minister, is rapidly becoming India’s most high profile politician. A leading candidate for Prime Minister in the country’s upcoming elections, the mere mention of his name can start a long, angry debate here. But one thing seldom discussed are his “yojanas,” or health care schemes for the poor.

And that’s unfortunate because they are currently the leading answer that Indian politicians have to the question of what should be done about sick residents living below the poverty line.

On the surface, few would argue against the promotion of these yojanas. One of them insures patients who live below the poverty line and their families up to $3800 (US Dollars) for serious medical procedures like surgeries.

But critics of the plans argue that they are a political posture, and do nothing to alter the lives of the patients who use them.

We spoke to private doctors who refuse to accept the plans, because of the lack of adequate reimbursement. This relegates patients to a government hospital system that is flawed, unsanitary and downright dangerous.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.

On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.

The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

Women at the Kabul International Airport prepare to board a plane for the Hajj, the pilgrimage to mecca.

Image and caption by Jeffrey E Stern. Afghanistan, 2014.
Read Stern’s profile of Ashraf Ghani, former Johns Hopkins professor, World Bank official and former presidential candidate.

Women at the Kabul International Airport prepare to board a plane for the Hajj, the pilgrimage to mecca.

Image and caption by Jeffrey E Stern. Afghanistan, 2014.

Read Stern’s profile of Ashraf Ghani, former Johns Hopkins professor, World Bank official and former presidential candidate.

Indispensable for a TB story.

Image by Jens Gould, via Instagram. Vietnam, 2014.
Reporting forthcoming from the project “The Price of Health: TB Budget Gaps in Vietnam" by Jens Gould and David Rochkind, sponsored by the Pulitzer Center.

Indispensable for a TB story.

Image by Jens Gould, via Instagram. Vietnam, 2014.

Reporting forthcoming from the project “The Price of Health: TB Budget Gaps in Vietnam" by Jens Gould and David Rochkind, sponsored by the Pulitzer Center.

Wasteland.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.
Forthcoming project reporting on wasted food—all 1.3 billion annual tons of it, according to the UN.
Award-winning director Karim’s debut film War Child chronicles the life story of Emmanuel Jal, a former South Sudanese child soldier who became an international hip-hop artist.

Wasteland.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.

Forthcoming project reporting on wasted food—all 1.3 billion annual tons of it, according to the UN.

Award-winning director Karim’s debut film War Child chronicles the life story of Emmanuel Jal, a former South Sudanese child soldier who became an international hip-hop artist.

Photojournalist Boryana Katsarova documented the events leading up to Crimea’s secession from Ukraine. She discusses those turbulent days in this video.

More reporting from the project ”Ukraine: Crimea Under Siege,” by Boryana Katsarova and Dimiter Kenarov.

There are few things quite as shocking as speaking to a sick person who was denied treatment simply for being sick. But for many AIDS patients in rural Andhra Pradesh, that’s exactly what’s happening at their local government hospitals. 
Andhra Pradesh has long had a serious problem with HIV/AIDS. It has the highest rate of transmission in the country. But the worst place for the spread of the disease is in Warangal, a district known for its trucking industry and underground economy of prostitution.
There, AIDS patients we met were seeking refuge in Catholic missions because they were afraid of the treatment they would receive at government hospitals. Some patients we spoke to were turned away from the very hospitals that informed them of their positive tests.
The Andhra Pradesh government denies that this is happening, and assured us of “zero percent discrimination” at their hospitals. The AIDS patients we spoke to—as well as the caregivers at charitable organizations who provide refuge to those patients—say otherwise.
Due to a lack of education, or proper understanding of the diseases they are treating, doctors and nurses at Indian government hospitals are shunning the very people who need their help the most. Beyond being ethically corrupt, it’s also illegal, and the situation requires urgent reform.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.
Siva and Hayden report on the routine discrimination of patients with HIV/AIDS in the state hospitals of Andhra Pradesh for the New York Times. From their project "India’s Hospital Crisis." 

There are few things quite as shocking as speaking to a sick person who was denied treatment simply for being sick. But for many AIDS patients in rural Andhra Pradesh, that’s exactly what’s happening at their local government hospitals. 

Andhra Pradesh has long had a serious problem with HIV/AIDS. It has the highest rate of transmission in the country. But the worst place for the spread of the disease is in Warangal, a district known for its trucking industry and underground economy of prostitution.

There, AIDS patients we met were seeking refuge in Catholic missions because they were afraid of the treatment they would receive at government hospitals. Some patients we spoke to were turned away from the very hospitals that informed them of their positive tests.

The Andhra Pradesh government denies that this is happening, and assured us of “zero percent discrimination” at their hospitals. The AIDS patients we spoke to—as well as the caregivers at charitable organizations who provide refuge to those patients—say otherwise.

Due to a lack of education, or proper understanding of the diseases they are treating, doctors and nurses at Indian government hospitals are shunning the very people who need their help the most. Beyond being ethically corrupt, it’s also illegal, and the situation requires urgent reform.

Text by Michael Edison Hayden. Image by Sami Siva. India, 2014.

Siva and Hayden report on the routine discrimination of patients with HIV/AIDS in the state hospitals of Andhra Pradesh for the New York Times. From their project "India’s Hospital Crisis."