In the Field

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Last day photographing in the Bhutanese refugee camps in eastern Nepal. It is Saturday, so a time for recreation … And placing bets on inter-camp volleyball matches! The rest of the story will have to wait till immigration day. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Last day photographing in the Bhutanese refugee camps in eastern Nepal. It is Saturday, so a time for recreation … And placing bets on inter-camp volleyball matches! The rest of the story will have to wait till immigration day. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Smile Devan nuzzles his daughter Rina Shah, 7, moments before she departs for the United States. She is a Bhutanese refugee but Smile is a Nepalese citizen. It will likely be years before they are able to see each other again.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Smile Devan nuzzles his daughter Rina Shah, 7, moments before she departs for the United States. She is a Bhutanese refugee but Smile is a Nepalese citizen. It will likely be years before they are able to see each other again.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Life in the Bhutanese refugee camps in eastern Nepal has come to be defined by certain rituals, like the bi-monthly distribution of rice, lentils, salt and sugar from warehouses across the camps and the early morning queues around the communal water taps. Resettlement of refugees in “third countries” has brought new rituals to the camps. On weekdays, lists are posted around 1 p.m. on bulletin boards around the camps, drawing crowds of people anxious to know the status of their applications.

On Thursday and Friday mornings, buses painted bright white from the International Organization for Migration arrive to at the entrance to take refugees away for perhaps the last time. These refugees are those who have completed the lengthy resettlement process and are starting their journey to the United States, or any of the other countries who have agreed to host refugees. The bus rumbles out of the camp before 7 a.m. and will take them to small airport in nearby Bhadrapur and then to Kathmandu, where they’ll stay for a short orientation and then began their journey west.

Julia and I watched early one Thursday morning as refugees said their final goodbyes to friends and relatives. Many dressed in their best clothes—outfits purchased specially for the occasion. Manog Khanel, 40, is headed to Atlanta with his two teenaged daughters, 8-year-old son and wife. His family looked dapper, dressed in Western-style clothing—he in a slightly wrinkled black suit—and all wore red-stained rice pressed to their foreheads, which he said was to bring “good luck and best health.”

“Very happy,” he said, as he nervously fiddled with a new digital camera bought to document their new life in the United States.

Prabang Singh Tamang, 19, was headed to Erie, Pa. with his 16-year-old sister, whose face betrayed deep anxiety. They would join their uncle and aunt in the small lakeside city.

“I am happy and sad at the same time,” he said. “I am happy because I’m going to a good country, but I’m sad because I’m leaving many friends.”

Jyoty Khanel sits on a bus awaiting an appointment for a medical check-up required for her trip to the United States. She left the following day for the United States. 


Image and text by Moriah Balingit. Nepal, 2014. 


Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Life in the Bhutanese refugee camps in eastern Nepal has come to be defined by certain rituals, like the bi-monthly distribution of rice, lentils, salt and sugar from warehouses across the camps and the early morning queues around the communal water taps. Resettlement of refugees in “third countries” has brought new rituals to the camps. On weekdays, lists are posted around 1 p.m. on bulletin boards around the camps, drawing crowds of people anxious to know the status of their applications.

On Thursday and Friday mornings, buses painted bright white from the International Organization for Migration arrive to at the entrance to take refugees away for perhaps the last time. These refugees are those who have completed the lengthy resettlement process and are starting their journey to the United States, or any of the other countries who have agreed to host refugees. The bus rumbles out of the camp before 7 a.m. and will take them to small airport in nearby Bhadrapur and then to Kathmandu, where they’ll stay for a short orientation and then began their journey west.

Julia and I watched early one Thursday morning as refugees said their final goodbyes to friends and relatives. Many dressed in their best clothes—outfits purchased specially for the occasion. Manog Khanel, 40, is headed to Atlanta with his two teenaged daughters, 8-year-old son and wife. His family looked dapper, dressed in Western-style clothing—he in a slightly wrinkled black suit—and all wore red-stained rice pressed to their foreheads, which he said was to bring “good luck and best health.”

“Very happy,” he said, as he nervously fiddled with a new digital camera bought to document their new life in the United States.

Prabang Singh Tamang, 19, was headed to Erie, Pa. with his 16-year-old sister, whose face betrayed deep anxiety. They would join their uncle and aunt in the small lakeside city.

“I am happy and sad at the same time,” he said. “I am happy because I’m going to a good country, but I’m sad because I’m leaving many friends.”

Jyoty Khanel sits on a bus awaiting an appointment for a medical check-up required for her trip to the United States. She left the following day for the United States.
Image and text by Moriah Balingit. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.
Bhutanese refugees check a list outside camp in eastern Nepal to see who has been called up for third-country resettlement. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Bhutanese refugees check a list outside camp in eastern Nepal to see who has been called up for third-country resettlement. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Prabesh Ray Siwakoti, 5, future Pittsburgher.


Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Prabesh Ray Siwakoti, 5, future Pittsburgher.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Nima Dolma Tamang, 16, cries as she prepares to leave Sanischare, a Bhutanese refugee camp in Nepal, for the last time. She is bound for Erie, Pa. as part of the resettlement program that seeks to close the camps, open for more than two decades.


Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Nima Dolma Tamang, 16, cries as she prepares to leave Sanischare, a Bhutanese refugee camp in Nepal, for the last time. She is bound for Erie, Pa. as part of the resettlement program that seeks to close the camps, open for more than two decades.

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Hindu priest Khagendra Prasad Timsina, 54, is apprehensive about his impending resettlement in Pittsburgh, Pa. As a Bhutanese refugee living in Nepal he worries the move will lessen his chances of ever returning home. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Hindu priest Khagendra Prasad Timsina, 54, is apprehensive about his impending resettlement in Pittsburgh, Pa. As a Bhutanese refugee living in Nepal he worries the move will lessen his chances of ever returning home. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Jyoty Kharel, 16, boards a bus for her final medical examine before heading for the United States. Tomorrow she will leave behind the Bhutanese refugee camp in Nepal and move to Atlanta, Georgia. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Jyoty Kharel, 16, boards a bus for her final medical examine before heading for the United States. Tomorrow she will leave behind the Bhutanese refugee camp in Nepal and move to Atlanta, Georgia. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Bimal Gurung was returning home from boarding school when he was turned away by the Bhutanese army. He fled to India, then Nepal where he has been living as a refugee for more than 20 years. He hasn’t seen or heard from his family since. His experience led him to alcohol dependency but today he is clean and a volunteer counselor to other refugees. 

Image and text by Moriah Balingit, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Bimal Gurung was returning home from boarding school when he was turned away by the Bhutanese army. He fled to India, then Nepal where he has been living as a refugee for more than 20 years. He hasn’t seen or heard from his family since. His experience led him to alcohol dependency but today he is clean and a volunteer counselor to other refugees.

Image and text by Moriah Balingit, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

"All my beloved died here and I will die here too." Purnawati Timsina, 81, does not want to resettle in a third country and is content to live out her days in Sanischare, a Bhutanese refugee camp in eastern Nepal. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

"All my beloved died here and I will die here too." Purnawati Timsina, 81, does not want to resettle in a third country and is content to live out her days in Sanischare, a Bhutanese refugee camp in eastern Nepal. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

In line at the refugee camp waiting for material to make new school uniforms. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

In line at the refugee camp waiting for material to make new school uniforms. 

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees, Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.









Setting up at Photoville, New York, with work on show by Pulitzer Center grantees Sean Gallagher, Jason Motlagh and Larry C. Price.










Image by Meghan Dhaliwal via Instagram. New York, 2014.

September 18-28 at New York’s Photoville: Global Goods, Local Costs: Fashion’s True Price—a visual exploration of the human lives affected by the production of the clothing and accessories we wear every day.
Photoville is New York City’s largest annual photographic event—a modular venue built from re-purposed shipping containers creating an immersive and interactive, free photography exhibition.

Photoville Thursday, September 18 Exhibition Launch 4:00 pm Opening Night Celebration 7:30 pm The Uplands of Pier 5* One Brooklyn Bridge Park 360 Furman Street Brooklyn, New York City, NY 11201
*off Furman Street and next to One Brooklyn Bridge Park
The exhibition continues through Sunday, September 28. For a full schedule, including exhibition times and other events, visit the Photoville website.

Setting up at Photoville, New York, with work on show by Pulitzer Center grantees Sean Gallagher, Jason Motlagh and Larry C. Price.

Image by Meghan Dhaliwal via Instagram. New York, 2014.

September 18-28 at New York’s Photoville: Global Goods, Local Costs: Fashion’s True Price—a visual exploration of the human lives affected by the production of the clothing and accessories we wear every day.

Photoville is New York City’s largest annual photographic event—a modular venue built from re-purposed shipping containers creating an immersive and interactive, free photography exhibition.

Photoville
Thursday, September 18
Exhibition Launch 4:00 pm
Opening Night Celebration 7:30 pm
The Uplands of Pier 5*
One Brooklyn Bridge Park
360 Furman Street
Brooklyn, New York City, NY 11201

*off Furman Street and next to One Brooklyn Bridge Park

The exhibition continues through Sunday, September 28. For a full schedule, including exhibition times and other events, visit the Photoville website.

Dragon fruit is sold at the open air street market in Beijing, China.

Image and caption by Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.
Read how Shanghai tries to avoid the “middle-income trap” in a report by Pulitzer Center grantees Rodney White and Lynn Hicks.

Dragon fruit is sold at the open air street market in Beijing, China.

Image and caption by Rodney White, via Instagram. China, 2014.

Read how Shanghai tries to avoid the “middle-income trap” in a report by Pulitzer Center grantees Rodney White and Lynn Hicks.

Sanskar Kumbra, 11 months, is bound for Canada.  

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Sanskar Kumbra, 11 months, is bound for Canada.  

Image and text by Julia Rendleman, via Instagram. Nepal, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit report from Nepal on Bhutan’s displaced persons preparing to resettle in the United States.

Female militia member from Kobani in Kurdish North Syria firing at Islamic State lines.

Three photos taken at the frontline as Kurds fire at Islamic State positions in the enclave of Kobani in late June; as per reporting by James Harkin for the Guardian and Newsweek.  

The reason why these photos are now important is because IS has taken many villages around Kobani, and today threatens to overrun the enclave whole, which would lead to a huge massacre.

Images and text by James Harkin. Northern Syria, 2014.

In only a year of its existence the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS) has grown substantially and spectacularly renewed the franchise of militant Islamic extremism for a new generation. James Harkin reports in a Pulitzer Center supported project.